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Inventi Impact - Cardiology & Haematology
(Formerly Inventi Rapid/Impact: Blood)

Articles

  • Inventi:hbl/95/14
    PREVALENCE AND RELATED FACTORS OF ANEMIA IN HAART-NAIVE HIV POSITIVE PATIENTS AT GONDAR UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, NORTHWEST ETHIOPIA
    Getachew Ferede, Yitayih Wondimeneh

    Background: Anaemia is a common complication of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and may have various causes. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and related factors of anemia in HAART-naive HIV positive Patients. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on HAART naive HIV positive patients at the Gondar University Hospital between September 2011 and August 2012. Socio-demographic and immunohematological (hemoglobin and CD4+ T cells) data were collected carefully from the existing ART logbook and patient follow up cards. Anaemia was defined according to the WHO criteria. Results: The overall prevalence of anaemia was 138 (35%). Female HAART naive HIV positive patients had significantly (P < 0.05) higher prevalence of anaemia than males (62% Vs 38%). The prevalence of anaemia at different CD4 level was; 6 (4%) with CD4 count greater than 500 cells/µL, 18 (13%) with a CD4 count of 350–500 cells/µL, 37 (27%) with a CD4 count of 200–349 cells/µL, 44 (32%) with a CD4 count of 100–199 cells/µL, 14 (10%) with a CD4 count of 50–99 and 19 (14%) with CD4 count of less than 50 cells/µL. Conclusions: Our findings showed that one-third of HAART naïve HIV positive patients were anaemic and the increase in prevalence of anaemia with decreased CD4 cell count was statistically significant. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of anaemia in these patients are essential.

    How to Cite this Article
    CC Compliant Citation: Ferede and Wondimeneh: Prevalence and related factors of anemia in HAART-naive HIV positive patients at Gondar University Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. BMC Hematology 2013 13:8, doi:10.1186/2052-1839-13-8. © 2013 Ferede and Wondimeneh; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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